Optimum turbine system reliability requires a well designed lubricating system and use of a good lubricant that is free of contaminants. Achieving this requires use of proper purification methods to ensure that the oil is free of detrimental contaminants. In addition,it requires an ongoing monitoring program to ensure that the oil quality is within specifications and that corrective action is taken to minimize contaminant generation and ingression. The benefits of purification of an operating lubrication system can be significantly reduced if the lubricating systems are not initially cleaned to a level that will prevent component damage on initial start up after manufacturing or rebuilding.

By : Ibnu Andhika

Standard Guide for Cleaning, Flushing, and Purification of Steam, Gas, and Hydroelectric Turbine Lubrication Systems

INTRODUCTION

Optimum turbine system reliability requires a well designed lubricating system and use of a good lubricant that is free of contaminants. Achieving this requires use of proper purification methods to ensure that the oil is free of detrimental contaminants. In addition,it requires an ongoing monitoring program to ensure that the oil quality is within specifications and that corrective action is taken to minimize contaminant generation and ingression. The benefits of purification of an operating lubrication system can be significantly reduced if the lubricating systems are not initially cleaned to a level that will prevent component damage on initial start up after manufacturing or rebuilding. Care and thorough cleaning are required to minimize and remove contaminants during fabrication, rebuilding, orinstallation, or combination there of. Because contaminants will remain from these processes, it is necessary to flush and purify the system to remove them prior to start up. Ongoing purification is required to maintain pure oil during operation. In new systems, the emphasis is on the removal of contaminants in troduced during manufacture, storage, field fabrication, and installation. In operational systems, the emphasis is on the removal of contaminants that are generated during operation and by malfunctions that occur during operation or contaminants that are introduced during overhaul,or both.

Standard Practice for In-Service Monitoring of Mineral Turbine Oils for Steam and Gas Turbines

INTRODUCTION

The in-service monitoring of turbine oils has long been recognized by the power-generation industry as being necessary to ensure long trouble-free operation ofturbines. The two main types of stationary turbines used for power generation are steam and gas turbines. The lubrication requirements are quite similar but there are important differences in that gas turbine oils are subjected to significantly higher localized “hotspot” temperatures and water contamination is less likely. Steam turbine oils are normally expected to last for many years. In some turbines up to 20 years of service life has been obtained. Gas turbine oils by comparison have a shorter service life. Many of the monitoring tests used for steam turbine oils are applicable to gas turbine oils. This practice is designed to assist the user to understand how oils deteriorate and to carry out a meaningful program of sampling and testing of oils in use. Also covered are some important aspects of interpretation of results and suggested action steps so as to maximize service life.

Attachment : ASTM D 6439 Flushing Turbine Oils.pdf & ASTM D 4378 Monitoring Turbine Oils.pdf

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