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Natural gas producers, domestically and abroad, have increasingly targeted lowerquality gas resources for development. This trend continues to drive the industry to search for better, more cost-effective and environmentally acceptable methods for treating sour gas. For economic reasons, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) scavenging has emerged as the technology of choice for gas with low H2S concentrations, for example, less than 200 ppmv.

By Kevin S. Fisher, CrystaTech, Inc.; and Dennis Leppin, Raj Palla and Dr. Aqil Jamal, GTI E&P and Gas Processing Group.

Design, troubleshooting and optimization of direct-injection H2S scavenging systems pose many challenges.
GTI and others from the oil and gas industry are working together to develop engineering test data and
modeling software needed to effectively address these tasks.

Natural gas producers, domestically and abroad, have increasingly targeted lowerquality gas resources for development. This trend continues to drive the industry to search for better, more cost-effective and environmentally acceptable methods for treating sour gas. For economic reasons, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) scavenging has emerged as the technology of choice for gas with low H2S concentrations, for example, less than 200 ppmv. Operators frequently select the direct-injection method of applying H2S scavengers because of the lower capital costs and/or the severe restrictions on
space and weight encountered with offshore applications. While the directinjection
method offers these advantages over batch application of liquid or solid scavenging agents in large tower contactors, the ability to predict the performance of the direct-injection system or achieve treatment specifications without excessive chemical usage is frequently a challenge. For these reasons, Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and others in the industry have directed research during the past decade to develop an improved understanding of the fundamental mechanisms controlling the direct-injection scavenging process. The potential benefit of such an effort is substantial, considering the estimated $50 million/year spent on H2S scavenging chemicals in the United States alone.

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