Safety Performance Indicators (“SPIs”) provide important tools for any enterprise that handles signifi cant quantities of hazardous substances (whether using, producing, storing, transporting, disposing of, or otherwise handling chemicals) including enterprises that use chemicals in manufacturing other products. Specifi cally, SPIs help enterprises understand whether risks of chemical accidents are being appropriately managed. The goal of SPI
Programmes is to help enterprises fi nd and fi x potential problems before an accident occurs.
By taking a pro-active approach to risk management, enterprises not only avoid system failures and the potential for costly incidents, they also benefi t in terms of business effi ciency. For example, the same indicators that reveal whether risks are being controlled can often show whether operating conditions are being optimised.

Safety Performance Indicators (“SPIs”) provide important tools for any enterprise that handles signifi cant quantities of hazardous substances (whether using, producing, storing, transporting, disposing of, or otherwise handling chemicals) including enterprises that use chemicals in manufacturing other products. Specifi cally, SPIs help enterprises understand whether risks of chemical accidents are being appropriately managed. The goal of SPI
Programmes is to help enterprises fi nd and fi x potential problems before an accident occurs.
By taking a pro-active approach to risk management, enterprises not only avoid system failures and the potential for costly incidents, they also benefi t in terms of business effi ciency. For example, the same indicators that reveal whether risks are being controlled can often show whether operating conditions are being optimised.

This Guidance on Developing Safety Performance Indicators (“Guidance on SPI”) was prepared to assist enterprises that wish to implement and/or review Safety Performance Indicator Programmes.2 It was developed by the OECD Working Group on Chemical Accidents,3 bringing together experts from the private and public sectors to identify best practices in measuring safety performance. It is a complement to the OECD Guiding Principles on Chemical Accident
Prevention, Preparedness and Response (2nd ed, 2003)4 (the “Guiding Principles”) and is intended to be consistent with other major initiatives related to the development of safety performance indicators.

This Guidance is not prescriptive. In fact, each enterprise is encouraged to consider how to tailor its Programme to its own specifi c needs and to use only those parts of the Guidance that are helpful in light of its own circumstances.
The three chapters in this Guidance are designed to help enterprises better understand safety performance indicators, and how to implement SPI Programmes. Specifi cally:

• Chapter 1 provides important background information on the Guidance and on SPIs more generally including

(i) a description of the target audience for this Guidance, (ii) defi nitions of SPIs and related terms, and (iii) insights on the reasons for implementing an SPI Programme.

• Chapter 2 sets out a seven-step process for implementing an SPI Programme, along with three examples of how different types of enterprises might approach the establishment of such a Programme. These seven steps build on the experience of a number of enterprises in the UK that worked with the Health and Safety Executive to develop a practical approach for applying performance indicators.

• Chapter 3 provides additional support for the development of an SPI Programme by setting out a menu of possible elements (targets, outcome indicators and activities indicators). This menu is extensive in light of the different types of potentially interested enterprises, recognising that each enterprise will likely choose only a limited number of the elements to monitor its key areas of concern. Furthermore, it is understood that an enterprise may decide to implement an SPI Programme in steps, focusing fi rst on only a few priority areas, and then expanding and amending its Programme as experience is gained.
Annexes provide further support with an expanded explanation of metrics and a summary of targets, along with a glossary, a list of selected references and a copy of the Guiding Principles’ “Golden Rules.”

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